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Chemung County Library District: Giving Young Children the Tools to Become Successful Readers July 16, 2016

Posted by CCLD in Youth Services.
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1000books1000 Books Before Kindergarten is an ongoing program based upon evidence that the more children (ages 0 – 5) hear books read to them, the more prepared they will be to learn and enjoy reading upon reaching Kindergarten.

The Benefits of Reading to Your Child: Research shows that children with larger vocabularies are better readers. Knowing many words helps children recognize written words and understand what they mean.

Vocabulary is learned from books more than from normal conversations with adults or other children or from the TV. Children will gain Narrative & Story Telling skills that will help children better understand what they are reading. Being able to rhyme and sing will give your child a Phonological Awareness that will help them as they begin to sound out words when learning to read.

By helping your child gain Letter Awareness, knowing the names and sounds of letters, children learn how to sound out words themselves. And most importantly, Children who enjoy shared reading time, and see others around them enjoying reading will want to learn how to read.

Any child from birth until he or she enters kindergarten can participate in the program. Listening to stories during Story Time counts towards books read, asks staff members for our Story Time hours or visit our Calendar of Events (http://ccld.lib.ny.us/). Studies have shown that families who start reading aloud to their children at birth help to strengthen their language skills and build their vocabulary – two important tools for beginning to learn to read when they enter kindergarten.

  • Register – At the Horseheads Free Library, the Big Flats Library or the Steele Memorial Library and take home your first reading log.
  • Track Your Reading – Each time you read a book with your child, fill in a circle on the reading log.
  • Show us Your Reading Logs – When you reach 100 books, bring in your reading log, and at each 100-books mark, you get a “100 books!” sticker.
  • Read More Books! When you get all the way to 1000, you’ll receive a lunch box for Kindergarten!

 For more information or to download our convenient reading logs (or use our iPhone or Android App) and our recommended reading list visit 1000booksbeforekindergarten.org.

 Horseheads Free Library is hosting their annual 1000 Books Before Kindergarten kickoff Storytime on Tuesday August 30th at 10:30.

Register for the program and receive your introductory bag and

first reading log, listen to stories, rhymes and make a craft.

Celebrate kids who have reached the 1000 book goal!

 How To Pick A Book Your Child Will LOVE:

Books for Infants 0-12 months:

  • Books with simple, large pictures or designs with bright colors. Images should be of familiar objects, or other babies.
  • Small, stiff Cardboard, Board Books made for small hands.
  • Washable cloth books to cuddle and mouth & Plastic/Vinyl books for bath time.

 Books for Young Toddlers 12-24 months:

  • Sturdy books they can handle and carry.
  • Books with photos of children doing familiar things like sleeping, eating or playing.
  • Books with only a few words on each page, with simple rhymes and predictable text.

Books for Toddlers 2-3 years:

  • Books that tell simple stories.
  • Books with rhymes, rhythms, and repetitions they can learn by heart.
  • Food, Animals, Vehicles and Bedtime books are favorite subjects.
  • Books about saying Hello and Goodbye.

Books for Toddlers 2-3 years:

  • Books that tell stories.
  • Books about kids who look and live like them, as well as books about kids living in different places.
  • Books about counting, ABCs, shapes or sizes.
  • Books about making friends and going to school

This program is graciously funded by the Friends of the Horseheads Free Library.

Amanda Farley
Head of Youth Services, Horseheads Free Library, CCLD

Fall Storytimes & 1000 Books Before Kindergarten September 2, 2015

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1000booksFall Storytimes at CCLD libraries are just around the corner, beginning the week of September 14 at all branches; check our website for dates and times. We offer storytimes for babies, toddlers and preschoolers and all are drop in, no registration is required. Storytimes are a wonderful way to introduce your child to the joys of reading and increase their vocabulary, as well as help them to learn social skills. Our storytimes are full of fun too…interactive songs, flannel stories, rhymes and props that enhance the experience and make it pleasurable for caregivers as well as kids…and while you’re at the library, sign up for our latest early literacy program: 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten. (Currently available at Steele, Horseheads and Big Flats Libraries and funded by the Friends of the Horseheads Library.) This free, self-paced program challenges parents and caregivers to read at least 1,000 books before the child enters school. Research has shown that reading to children helps them be better prepared for school as it builds their vocabulary and stimulates language and cognitive skills. Reading together is great for bonding too, and stories read in storytime or at daycare can count as well. Ask us about this exciting new offering and we’ll see you soon at Storytime!

Happy Reading!

Janet Ackerman
Head of Youth Services
Steele Memorial Library, CCLD

Non-fiction for kids and teens at the library July 16, 2012

Posted by poppendeckc in Youth Services.
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When was the last time you checked out the library’s children’s collection of non-fiction?

Our collection covers a vast array of subjects and current events at reading levels for varying ages – from kindergarteners to high schoolers.  Juvenile non-fiction includes EVERYTHING from biographies, crafts, cultures and folktales, gardening, poetry to recipes, sports, and even world records!

Non-fiction also encompasses the facts on creatures with which we coexist, from domestic to wild and even the prehistoric varieties.  Ever curious about an otter’s life? Or how long tortoises really live (and where) or what colors dinosaurs were? Non-fiction fascinates us with theories of the galaxy, the universe, the forming of the oceans, the world of insects, and infinite possibilities from many realms!

Non-fiction contains history, biographies of heroes and fiends, poetry for all reasons.  It is rich with cultural resources to help us understand our neighbors in the world both past and present. So much knowledge is custom-packaged for kids of all ages in the juvenile section.

The library also has a specialized non-fiction collection for teens and young adults. This collection has a juvenile rating, but covers multiple subjects with a greater sophistication. The subjects featured are more advanced, encompassing subjects such as tattoos, acting/playwriting, eating disorders, fashion through the decades, art, and mythology.

Come explore our world through the rows of non-fiction books available at your local library branch, and begin your virtual tour of so many worlds!

Caroline Poppendeck, Librarian
Head of Youth Services
Steele Memorial Library

Reading – Then and Now June 25, 2012

Posted by poppendeckc in Youth Services.
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The Youth Services staff enjoyed a lively conversation in regards to our favorite books as children. Some of the series we favored were: Donna Parker, Bobbsey Twins, Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys, The Dana Girls.  Once upon a time, parents dreaded the steady diet of what they considered unworthy volumes of “tripe” their children were enamored with, and preferred they would pick up literary classics like, Gulliver’s Travels, Treasure Island, or Little Women.

We, on the other hand, consumed our favorites with relish, some of us admitting to reading favorite volumes over and over. We couldn’t get enough of the mystery, humor, beloved or hated characters, and the overall familiarity these books presented to us. Classics? Not interested.

You know what? We had it right. The lure of our favorite “tripe” expanded our worlds, introduced us to language both written and spoken, sated our hunger for knowledge and at the same time, made us hungry for more. Book lovers were born of these disrespected volumes, paving the way of our lifelong love of learning.

Literacy experts now base great value on reading – anything – as long as the skill is developed, practiced, and strives for mastery. Comic books, cereal boxes, games of any kind which include vocabulary are encouraged for honing reading skills and interest in the written word. So much research has been done showing early literacy sets the tone for overall learning throughout life, that no path can be overlooked if it builds reading skills.

So, outlooks have changed, but the true barometer for promoting literacy is to locate what a child finds appealing, then let them loose on it, to develop a long-term relationship with books and reading. And if you are not sure what they may like, most of our libraries have some Hardy Boys or Nancy Drew series books on our shelves…

Caroline Poppendeck, Librarian
Head of Youth Services
Steele Memorial Library

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