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Newly acquired and forthcoming nonfiction titles at the Horseheads Free Library January 5, 2017

Posted by CCLD in Horseheads, Recommendations.
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Here is a list of newly added or soon to be added nonfiction titles from the CCLD-Horseheads Free Library. You can search STARCat, use our Bookmyne App, or give your home branch a call to place a hold on any of these titles.

Owen Frank, Branch Supervisor

No Quarter: The Three Lives of Jimmy Page by Martin Power
jimmypage

Mind Over Money: The Psychology of Money and How to Use It Better by Claudia Hammond
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Leaving the OCD Circus: Your Big Ticket Out of Having to Control Every Little Thing by Kirsten Pagacz
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Being a dog : following the dog into a world of smell by Alexandra Horowitz
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I’m Your Biggest Fan: Awkward Encounters and Assorted Misadventures in Celebrity Journalism
by Kate Coyne
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Forthcoming Titles

Coming Soon!
Ray and Joan: The Man Who Made the McDonald’s Fortune and the Woman Who Gave It All Away by Lisa Napoli
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Coming Soon!
Cat Castles: 20 Cardboard Habitats You Can Build Yourself by Carin Oliver
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A variety of new non-fiction at Steele October 3, 2014

Posted by CCLD in New Non-Fiction, Recommendations, Steele.
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Heads up PsychologyMuch like our non-fiction collection, this month’s “Librarian’s Picks” covers a potpourri of subjects. I hope one of these books catches your interest!

158.1 WEE Heads Up Psychology by Marcus Weeks This book offers an explanation of Psychological theories and how they relate to everyday life. The book is presented in graphic illustrations and diagrams. It should have an appeal to teens and their parents, and anyone who wants to know the basics that the field of Psychology offers.

324.62 TET The Myth of Seneca Falls Memory and the Women’s Suffrage Movement
1848-1898
by Lisa Tetrault. This intriguing book challenges the standard narrative of the history of the Women’s Rights Movement in the United States.

942.055 MOR The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England by Ian Mortimer. The author uses diaries, letters and books re-creating a vivid portrait of daily life in Elizabethan England, from the view of both the royals and the peasants.

796.83 GEM Boxing a Concise History of the Sweet Science by Gerald R Gems. This book covers a history of the sport, including social issues and marks historic events of boxing through stories and pictures.

796.83 SMI A History of Women’s Boxing by Malissa Smith. This book traces the history of Women’s boxing from the 1700’s to the 2012 Olympic Games. It highlights the struggles, obstacles and successes of the women involved in this sport.

Connie Ogilvie, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

There’s a book for that! July 7, 2014

Posted by roganp in District News, Recommendations, Steele.
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PhyllisBy the time you read this, I will be retired. Connie Ogilvie has taken over the writing of this column but I asked her if I could use it to say goodbye. I have loved working in a public library, meeting our patrons and volunteers and talking books with them. Another great benefit of working in a public library is working with other reference librarians who keep up with the latest technology and are so happy to keep other staff and patrons updated too. Please look for the list of technology classes on our calendar of events.

We started Librarian’s Picks on our website twenty years ago, to try and let people know about all the treasures and information in the nonfiction section of the library. Although I always considered myself a reader and a public library user, I never realized how much easier my life would have been if I knew what was available in the library, before I became a librarian. For example: ¬†shortly after I got the job, my son who had just graduated from college and had moved to California called me on Thanksgiving Day to say he was in a hospital in Los Angeles because he had been in an accident, breaking several bones in his face; the surgeon who would be operating in the morning didn’t speak much English but did tell him that he might lose his eye or hearing and have scars. I told him to not sign anything until I called him back, knowing that we had a book in the reference department titled Best Doctors and other books listing medical specialties and the people accredited in them. I raced to the library and found he didn’t need a plastic surgeon but a cranial facial surgeon; the best one, the one who other doctors would take their family to, was in Santa Monica so I got his phone number and called my son back and had him call the doctor. He answered his phone and told Dan that he would gather his team and operate the next day, which he did. Dan had no hearing loss, no eyesight lost, no scars. The doctor’s staff asked how Dan knew to come to this surgeon and he answered: “My Mom is a librarian”. Later I came across books that I would have loved to know existed when I was a homemaker, such as What to expect the first year by Heidi Murkoff, and wanted other people to know they existed, but never found the perfect way. When we were young, my husband and I bought a very old house and remodeled it ourselves, learning as we went with all the mishaps and mistakes. I later discovered that the library had books that told you exactly how to do each of the things we struggled with.

My mantra as a librarian is “From birth to death, no matter what you do, there is a book or video to help you do it easier or better at the library. ” So the next time you have a question or are struggling with a problem , consider coming to the library for a book, a video, a class or a chat with a reference librarian.

Phyllis Rogan, Librarian

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