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Non-Fiction books for “making” at Steele September 2, 2014

Posted by CCLD in New Non-Fiction, Recommendations, Steele.
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September is not only back to school month, but it is National Library Card Sign-up month with many activities and programs scheduled in our local libraries. Computer classes are gearing up again, children’s story hours, movie events and adult programs as well. One unique event coming up this Fall, is the Chemung County Library District Maker Faire, being held at Steele Memorial Library on Saturday, September 20th, 2014, 11:00 AM to 4:00 PM. The CCLD Maker Faire will have live demonstrations of our new Maker labs, as well as hands on activities. This event “celebrates arts, crafts, engineering, science projects and the Do-It Yourself (DIY) mindset.”

Our Non-fiction collection at Chemung County Library district has books on so many different subjects, you can explore and get ideas for a familiar project or something you have never tried before.

Arduino Workshop a Hands-on Introduction with 65 Projects by John Boxall 629.895 BOX
An overview of the Arduino system, programming and electronics and hands-on projects applying this knowledge and concepts.

The Maker Movement Manifesto: Rules for Innovation in the New World of Crafters, Hackers, and Tinkerers by Mark Hatch 658.406 HAT. The Maker Movement is about building and creating, this book explores the Maker Movement and what has come out of it.

That being said our Non-fiction collection is the place to go for information regarding any kinds of crafts 745.5, sewing 646.4, knitting 746.4, photography 770, and origami 736.9 and numerous other subjects.

Connie Ogilvie, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

Fascinating Biographies & Personal Narratives June 2, 2014

Posted by roganp in Recommendations.
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Glitter and GlueEven though I no longer choose nonfiction books for the library, I love to browse the New Nonfiction on the first floor of the Central Library of CCLD. There are so many good books on so many subjects, but I still tend to grab biographies or personal narratives; I grabbed three fascinating ones last month.

The first one was Glitter and Glue by Kelly Corrigan, which on the surface is about a woman who graduates from college and wants life to be an adventure; after she works for a year to save money, she and a friend take off for New Zealand , Thailand, and Australia, where she runs out of money and takes a job as a nanny. She writes really well and this appears to be a light, quick, fun read, but when you get to the end, you realize it is really about relationships, specifically between mothers and daughters and how it changes over time and experience. I so wanted to talk about the ideas in this book; I wished I belonged to a book club so I would be able to talk about it with others who had also read it.

The next one I read was One Doctor: close calls, cold cases and the mysteries of medicine by Brendan Reilly. It always amazes me how well some doctors write! I read anything by doctors Jerome Groopman or Atul Gawande and now I have a third doctor who illuminates life choices we all make. Drawing us in like the best medical shows on TV by describing his patients, he shows us how doctors make life and death decisions every day.

The third one I read was This is the Story of a Happy Marriage by Ann Patchett. The well-known writer of fiction writes not a straight biography but each chapter is an essay formerly written for a magazine or newspaper about some aspect of her life; she writes about her devotion to writing and gives advice to wanna-be-writers, she writes about caring for her dog, her grandmother and a nun who was her teacher in grade school. Her honesty and nuanced essays will make you consider what she says long after you have finished the book.

Although all of these books were about someone’s experiences, only one was in the biographies. Glitter can be found under call #910.4 COR and One Doctor can be found in #610. 69 REI.  Enjoy!

Phyllis Rogan, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

Mrow! New non-fiction books about cats… March 4, 2014

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Guys Can Be Cat Ladies TooIf you Google “cats” you can find the definition of cats, advice on health care for cats, cat quotes, cat blogs, and of course cats on YouTube. I noted “Adopt a Cat Month”, which is June, “National Cat Day”, October 29th, and don’t forget “National Hug Your Cat Day” which is celebrated on June 4th. I understand cats make wonderful pets and I know there are many cat lovers out there. This entry is for those who are already cat lovers, as well as those who are intrigued by our furry feline friends.

Our non-fiction collection boasts a treasure trove of books about cats, including raising a cat, cat first aid, and training your cat. There are also a number of books that contain anecdotal or humorous stories about cats. The Dewey decimal number to look for is 636.8, our selection is abundant, and you won’t be disappointed!

This month as I perused the New Book non-fiction section at the Central Library for inspiration to write about, I came across four interesting and different books about cats that caught my attention.

The Complete Cat Breed Book Edited by Dorling Kindersley, a beautifully illustrated book describing
100 cat breeds and information on caring for your cat.

The Cat Whisperer by Mieshelle Nagelschneider, practical and effective strategies for solving a wide range of feline behavior problems.

The Big New Yorker Book of Cats Foreword by Anthony Lane, a stellar collection of writers contributing stories about our feline companions from the archives of the New Yorker.

Guys Can Be Cat Ladies Too: A Guidebook for Men and Their Cats by Michael Showalter, a one of a kind guide to help a guy understand and ultimately bond with the felines in his life. Educational, and definitely humorous!

Connie Ogilvie, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

New Year, New You! January 21, 2014

Posted by CCLD in Recommendations.
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Unclutter your lifeAs I have been newly assigned to take charge of this vast sea of books called the Non-fiction Collection, I have also been given the daunting task of writing the “Librarians Picks” column. Much like the collection, there are so many incredible subject categories to choose from, to write about, and to recommend. Even if you are not a regular non-fiction reader, in order to counteract the winter blues, broaden your spectrum of knowledge, or just read something different you should give one of our non-fiction books a chance. Walking down the aisles, I see books on Cookery for preparing every food imaginable, and books for improving your health or organizing your home. On the first floor of Chemung County Library District-Central Library, just past the Customer Service desk, you will find the newly purchased non-fiction books readily available for browsing.

Our Adult Services Department has been doing Adult programs in the library themed “New Year, New You.” So in keeping with this theme I chose three new books that might interest you for those New Year resolutions.

Hungry Girl 200 Under 200 Just Desserts by Lisa Lillien, recipes for decadent treats all under 200 calories.

Unclutter Your Life In One Week written by Erin Rooney Doland, practical steps to organize your home, your office and even your life!

Quit Smoking For Life A Simple, Proven 5-Step Plan by Suzanne Schlosberg lays out a plan to finally beat the smoking habit.

Connie Ogilvie, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

Endangered Books October 9, 2013

Posted by roganp in Recommendations.
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Sailors' Journey Into WarI have been weeding the non-fiction collection, using a computer program that can generate a report of books that have not gone out recently. When we used to go to the shelves to weed the worn out, dirty out-of-date books, I enjoyed it. But now I keep finding books that I think would be so useful if someone just knew they were here! For example, one of the biographies on my weeding list is about a navy seaman’s experiences in WWII. The Title is A Sailors’ Journey into War by Robert A. Maher. It looked like a brand new book and wasn’t very old, as the author was remembering his past. I brought it home to my husband who had been on a destroyer in the navy (not in WWII – we’re old but not THAT old) and he read and loved it. He brought it to our daughter’s neighbor who was also in the navy and said it was the best book he ever read; really described what it was like to be on a destroyer in a hurricane. Do I weed it from the collection because it is not being checked out? How do I get these books into the hands of people who would enjoy them? How do I get people to come to the library and browse among the stacks, to find just that book that speaks to them?  Or get them to ask a librarian for suggestions as to what they would like to read about? It’s called Reader’s Advisory and one of the most fun parts of our job.  I would have thought books such as Everything you need to know about birth control or Understanding Weight Loss Programs would be helpful to many people but they don’t go out. Do they get used in the library? I don’t know. If you have any ideas, let me know.

Phyllis Rogan, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

Non-fiction for kids and teens at the library July 16, 2012

Posted by poppendeckc in Youth Services.
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When was the last time you checked out the library’s children’s collection of non-fiction?

Our collection covers a vast array of subjects and current events at reading levels for varying ages – from kindergarteners to high schoolers.  Juvenile non-fiction includes EVERYTHING from biographies, crafts, cultures and folktales, gardening, poetry to recipes, sports, and even world records!

Non-fiction also encompasses the facts on creatures with which we coexist, from domestic to wild and even the prehistoric varieties.  Ever curious about an otter’s life? Or how long tortoises really live (and where) or what colors dinosaurs were? Non-fiction fascinates us with theories of the galaxy, the universe, the forming of the oceans, the world of insects, and infinite possibilities from many realms!

Non-fiction contains history, biographies of heroes and fiends, poetry for all reasons.  It is rich with cultural resources to help us understand our neighbors in the world both past and present. So much knowledge is custom-packaged for kids of all ages in the juvenile section.

The library also has a specialized non-fiction collection for teens and young adults. This collection has a juvenile rating, but covers multiple subjects with a greater sophistication. The subjects featured are more advanced, encompassing subjects such as tattoos, acting/playwriting, eating disorders, fashion through the decades, art, and mythology.

Come explore our world through the rows of non-fiction books available at your local library branch, and begin your virtual tour of so many worlds!

Caroline Poppendeck, Librarian
Head of Youth Services
Steele Memorial Library

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