jump to navigation

Stop by to browse new non-fiction at Steele April 24, 2015

Posted by CCLD in New Non-Fiction, Recommendations, Steele.
Tags:
add a comment

sparepartsNew non-fiction books are always fun to browse, and this month is no exception.

Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik Larson is an incredibly detailed narrative of a well known event of World War I, the German attack on and the sinking of the Lusitania.

100 Years of Brodies With Hal Roach: the Jaunty Journeys of a Hollywood Motion Picture and Television Pioneer by Craig Calman is a book featuring the illustrious film career of the legendary film producer Hal Roach, famous for Laurel and Hardy , Our Gang Comedies, Topper, Of Mice and Men, and television series such as My Little Margie and the Gale Storm Show: Oh Susanna!.

Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad by Eric Foner brings to life the story of the Underground Railroad .

The Handy Investing Answer Book by Paul A. Tucci is a question and answer guide to investing. This book explains the differences in various investment instruments, clarifies concepts and definitions, and introduces investment strategies.

Spare Parts: Four Undocumented Teenagers, One Ugly Robot, and the Battle for the American Dream by Joshua Davis is a story about four Mexican American students who come together and build a robot out of scavenged parts, and win the “Marine Advanced Technology Education Robotics Competition at the University of California, Santa Barbara (2004). But the story also involves tails of immigration laws and the triumphs and tribulations for these four boys before and after the competition.

It is not just about New Year’s resolutions March 9, 2015

Posted by CCLD in New Non-Fiction, Recommendations, Steele.
add a comment

2020It is not just about New Year’s resolutions, the focus for Americans today seems to be about Healthy Lifestyles. There is information on healthy eating, special diets, healthy aging, and lifestyle changes in general. This trend of course is a tremendous boon for publishers, and there is definitely something for everyone. Below please find some of our New Non-fiction books to pique your interest.

20/20 Diet: Turn Your Weight Loss Vision Into Reality by Phil McGraw. This book explains seven reasons why dieters hit dieting roadblocks . The book also educates the reader in why they should eat the “right” foods to fuel their body properly. There is a diet or food plan included that can be continued for the rest of one’s life.

The Gluten-Free Revolution: Absolutely Everything You Need to Know About Losing the Wheat, Reclaiming Your Health, and Living Happily Ever After by Jax Peters Lowell. This book is packed with the newest information and resources on living without gluten. It guides readers through the basics of reading labels, preparing foods at home, and dining out.

The Rockstar Remedy: A Rock & Roll Doctor’s Prescription for Living a Long, Healthy Life by Dr. Gabrielle Francis. In this book, Dr. Gabrielle Francis, a holistic practitioner to the music industry’s elite, shares her inner secrets on keeping these performers at the top of their game, in spite of the fact they also party like rock stars.

Vitamania: Our Obsessive Quest for Nutritional Perfection by Catherine Price. An entertaining and enlightening investigation into the unregulated world of nutritional supplements. The author leans toward getting one’s nutrition from real food.

Connie Ogilvie, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

Self-improvement in 2015 February 23, 2015

Posted by CCLD in New Non-Fiction, Recommendations, Steele.
Tags: ,
add a comment

Anxiety BustersWhenever a New Year approaches we all tend to look towards declaring resolutions, making changes in our lives, and embarking on new paths. Even though 2015 has already rolled in, I see the Winter Blues as a perfect motivation for seeking these new paths to self-improvement.
On that note there are several New non-fiction books that I would like to share with you.

“10 Best Anxiety Busters: Simple Strategies to Take Control of Your Worry,” by Wehrenberg, Margaret. In ten simple techniques this guide describes effective remedies for worry and anxiety.

“The 20/20 Diet: Turn Your Weight Loss Vision Into Reality,” by McGraw, Phil. Dr. Phil discusses the reasons diets fail and identifies 20 key foods that will help you get beyond the failures and help you lose weight.

“Clear the Clutter, Find Happiness: One-Minute Tips For De-Cluttering and Refreshing Your Home and Your Life,” by Smallin, Donna. This book presents a manageable and simple approach to organizing and de-cluttering your home.

Connie Ogilvie, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

From pop culture to historical oddities, our new non-fiction books have some interesting subjects to appeal to all! December 12, 2014

Posted by CCLD in New Non-Fiction, Recommendations.
Tags: ,
add a comment

glamourgidgets“Glamour, Gidgets, and the Girl Next Door: Television’s Iconic Women from the ’50s, ’60s, and ’70s” by Herbie J. Pilato. This book is a celebration of the wonderful women of television that many of us grew up with. A fact filled book that tells these women’s stories, and praises their talents; as well as a resource book for those interested in Television Industry history.

“Yeah! Yeah! Yeah! The Story of Pop Music from Bill Haley to Beyoncé” by Bob Stanley. This book is an entertaining summary of pop music traced through familiar songs and musicians. It is an informative and humorous telling of the history of this music genre.

“Behind the Curtain: An Insider’s View of Jay Leno’s Tonight Show” by Dave Berg. This book was written by Jay Leno’s “Tonight Show” co-producer of 18 years. It is an entertaining and insightful account of Jay Leno and the making of the “Tonight Show.” It tells the story of the antics, humor and strategies behind the scenes of America’s leading late night TV show.

“Dreamers and Deceivers: True Stories of the Heroes and Villains Who Made America” by Glenn Beck. This book tells the untold story of familiar characters from history, including entrepreneurs, frauds, and charlatans. Once again Glenn Beck peaks our interest in this new series on history.

Connie Ogilvie, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

New Biographies at Steele Memorial Library November 5, 2014

Posted by CCLD in New Non-Fiction, Recommendations, Steele.
Tags: , , , ,
add a comment

Maeve BinchyA biography is a detailed account of a person’s life experiences, while an autobiography is written by the person themselves. If you are not familiar with our collection, the Chemung County Library District has a significant collection of biographies and autobiographies. While our library collection is a great resource for school assignments, it also can be an enriching experience to savor the detailed story of an interesting actor, politician, scientist or anyone you might admire. For the month of November, I am featuring several new biographies that have recently been added to our collection.

“Maeve Binchy: The Biography” by Piers Dudgeon. A comprehensive and uplifting biography of the much-loved Irish write that shows her life story was reflected in her books.

“Redeemer: The Life of Jimmy Carter” by Randall Balmer. – “Balmer explores the paradoxes of a man balancing faith and ideals against the pragmatics of politics and the evangelical tide that favored him and later turned so vehemently against him.” Booklist Starred Review

“Charlie Chaplin: A Brief Life” by Peter Ackroyd. a well-written portrait of the beloved film star, portraying the story of a gifted and complicated personality.

“Respect: The Life of Aretha Franklin” by David Ritz. A powerful portrait of one of the greatest musical talents, portrays the hardships and triumphs of her life story.

“John Wayne: The Life and Legend” by Scott Eyman. An entertaining portrait of an American movie icon, skillfully traced from his early childhood through his amazing Hollywood career.

Connie Ogilvie, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

When Grass Was Green by Sarah Krazinsky October 9, 2014

Posted by CCLD in Recommendations.
Tags:
add a comment

When Grass Was GreenThere is a World War I novel that I read several years ago, which has recently come to mind – as 2014 marks the 100th  anniversary of WWI.

The book is When Grass Was Green”, by local author Sarah Krazinsky.  I can still remember staying up until 3 o’clock in the morning, not being able to put this book down.  It is a romance that will keep you on the edge of your seat intertwined, with the coming of age of a young girl, a young town, and a young America.

The Steele Memorial Library owns this and many other books related to WWI so stop by to check one out today.

Sue Schoeffler
CCLD Library Clerk

 

A variety of new non-fiction at Steele October 3, 2014

Posted by CCLD in New Non-Fiction, Recommendations, Steele.
Tags: , ,
add a comment

Heads up PsychologyMuch like our non-fiction collection, this month’s “Librarian’s Picks” covers a potpourri of subjects. I hope one of these books catches your interest!

158.1 WEE Heads Up Psychology by Marcus Weeks This book offers an explanation of Psychological theories and how they relate to everyday life. The book is presented in graphic illustrations and diagrams. It should have an appeal to teens and their parents, and anyone who wants to know the basics that the field of Psychology offers.

324.62 TET The Myth of Seneca Falls Memory and the Women’s Suffrage Movement
1848-1898
by Lisa Tetrault. This intriguing book challenges the standard narrative of the history of the Women’s Rights Movement in the United States.

942.055 MOR The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England by Ian Mortimer. The author uses diaries, letters and books re-creating a vivid portrait of daily life in Elizabethan England, from the view of both the royals and the peasants.

796.83 GEM Boxing a Concise History of the Sweet Science by Gerald R Gems. This book covers a history of the sport, including social issues and marks historic events of boxing through stories and pictures.

796.83 SMI A History of Women’s Boxing by Malissa Smith. This book traces the history of Women’s boxing from the 1700’s to the 2012 Olympic Games. It highlights the struggles, obstacles and successes of the women involved in this sport.

Connie Ogilvie, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

Non-Fiction books for “making” at Steele September 2, 2014

Posted by CCLD in New Non-Fiction, Recommendations, Steele.
Tags: , , ,
add a comment

September is not only back to school month, but it is National Library Card Sign-up month with many activities and programs scheduled in our local libraries. Computer classes are gearing up again, children’s story hours, movie events and adult programs as well. One unique event coming up this Fall, is the Chemung County Library District Maker Faire, being held at Steele Memorial Library on Saturday, September 20th, 2014, 11:00 AM to 4:00 PM. The CCLD Maker Faire will have live demonstrations of our new Maker labs, as well as hands on activities. This event “celebrates arts, crafts, engineering, science projects and the Do-It Yourself (DIY) mindset.”

Our Non-fiction collection at Chemung County Library district has books on so many different subjects, you can explore and get ideas for a familiar project or something you have never tried before.

Arduino Workshop a Hands-on Introduction with 65 Projects by John Boxall 629.895 BOX
An overview of the Arduino system, programming and electronics and hands-on projects applying this knowledge and concepts.

The Maker Movement Manifesto: Rules for Innovation in the New World of Crafters, Hackers, and Tinkerers by Mark Hatch 658.406 HAT. The Maker Movement is about building and creating, this book explores the Maker Movement and what has come out of it.

That being said our Non-fiction collection is the place to go for information regarding any kinds of crafts 745.5, sewing 646.4, knitting 746.4, photography 770, and origami 736.9 and numerous other subjects.

Connie Ogilvie, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

Something For Everyone August 6, 2014

Posted by CCLD in Recommendations.
Tags:
add a comment

acquittalNon-Fiction books cover many topics and I find it hard to choose just one area to write about.

With back to school on the horizon….two parenting titles “Redefining Girly: How Parents Can Fight the Stereotyping and Sexualizing of Girlhood, from Birth to Tween” by Melissa Atkins Wardy, has eye opening advice on raising a balanced, self confident girl.

“8 Keys to End Bullying : Strategies for Parents & Schools” by Signe Whitson, provides an excellent set of tools for parents and teachers in dealing with bullies.

For sheer entertainment and items of interest…“Not to be Missed: Fifty-Four Favorites From a Lifetime of Film” by Kenneth Turan, enthusiastic reviews of the author’s favorite movies through the decades.

“Good Talk Dad: The Birds and the Bees..and Other conversations We Forgot to Have”, by Bill Geist and Willie Geist, a humorous book about the shared journey of this father-son relationship.

“Acquittal: An Insider Reveals the Stories and Strategies Behind Today’s Most Infamous Verdicts” by Richard Gabriel, discusses the intricate workings of the justice system, while highlighting some very famous trials and their verdicts.

Connie Ogilvie, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

THE GOOD LORD BIRD by James McBride July 25, 2014

Posted by CCLD in Recommendations.
Tags: , , ,
add a comment

The Good Lord BirdWith his novel The Good Lord Bird James McBride can stand shoulder to shoulder with the likes of Mark Twain and John Steinbeck. The book is thought provoking, passionate and beautifully written. It is also a great read of the kind that will have you glued to the page and regret leaving McBride’s world when it winds to its end. You come away wishing that McBride had gifted us with, at least, two or three hundred more pages.

The Good Lord Bird takes place in the “Bloody Kansas” of the 1850s where the question of its being a free or slave state was being argued with swords and blood. It is the picaresque story of Henry, a young slave who is – more or less – forced into freedom. To keep his rocky freedom, life and – truth be told – have an easier time of it, he dons a dress and becomes the comely “Onion”. The moniker is bestowed by no less a personage than John Brown. “Onion” finds “herself” pulled into Brown’s orbit and witnessing the God obsessed madman’s career from the Scourge of Kansas to his martyrdom at Harper’s Ferry. Along the way Onion meets the likes of Frederic Douglass and Harriet Tubman as well as having his disguise threatened by young love and lust.

McBride surveys the institution of slavery with a cold, clear eye. One sees the horrors, degradation and twisted values that slavery inculcated. At the same time there are surprising depths of compassion for the slave, the slave owner and those around who find themselves caught up in the historical tide. Violence flares up at the drop of an insult or a madman’s whim. Historical personages we now regard as secular saints are seen to have flaws aplenty that – strangely – add to their stature rather than diminish. The only character to retain her mythic proportions is Harriet Tubman, who comes across as fierce and canny a revolutionary as any born in the 20th century. All of this is brought to us in a rollicking, very funny and truly affecting tall tale. I cannot recommend The Good Lord Bird high enough.

Jack Olcott, Page
Horseheads Branch CCLD

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: