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New Non-Fiction Books at Steele August 3, 2016

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reclaiming“Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age,” by Sherry Turkle was technically published in October, 2015, but is a well reviewed book that I feel is worth mentioning.   This author proclaims that while we are constantly communicating by digital means and always plugged into our technical devices, our personal face- to-face communication is being neglected. Even our personal moments of solitude have been invaded. And it is this personal kind of communication and self-reflection that helps humanize our society, the traits that help us in our personal lives as well as our business lives. This book is a great reminder to help us balance technology in our everyday lives.

grunt-cover“Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War,” by Mary Roach explores how our soldiers combat the behind the scenes obstacles such as heat exhaustion, panic, noise and introduces the reader to the scientists who seek to conquer them. In her unique style, the author approaches this subject with scientific facts and humor. Library Journal and Booklist gave this book Starred reviews and Amazon ranked it Best Book of June 2016. This book should not be missed!

“Witness to the Revolution: Radicals, Resisters, Vets, Hippies, and the Year America Lost Its Mind and Found Its Soul,” by Clara Bingham is a captivating oral history recording the turbulent events of 1969-1970. As the ’60s drew to a close, America was dealing with social and political upheaval, and this book weaves together the voices and stories from this era. It is admittedly a long book, but one that is both thought provoking and discussion worthy.

Connie Ogilvie, Librarian
Chemung County Library District

Recommended Adult Fiction Summer Reads June 6, 2016

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With summer almost upon us, the following is a list (in no particular order) of books that caught the attention of those in the know as strong contenders for your reading time. All are or will be available shortly within the library system. Have a great summer!

mirrorthief.jpgThe Mirror Thief, by Martin Seay – part supernatural mystery, part ominous modern thriller, and a true delight.

Zero K, by Don DeLillo – DeLillo packs death, information, mannequins into one of his finest books.

I Almost Forgot About You, by Terry McMillan -There’s no better creator than McMillan of female characters who refuse to give up on dreaming, or on looking back to find the way forward in their noisy, messy, joyous lives.

Marrow Island, by Alexis M. Smith – Smith suffuses her setting with dread and menace, raising the question: What is really happening on Marrow Island?

The Heavenly Table, by Donald Ray Pollock – a psychotic terror ride through an early 20th century hillbilly hellscape that puts the family of a swindled, good-hearted farmer on a collision course with three brothers on a crime spree.

Sweetbitter: A novel, by Stephanie Danler – A lush novel of the senses—of taste and hunger, seeing and understanding, love and desire.

Heat and Light: A Novel, by Jennifer Haigh – To drill or not to drill? Prison guard Rich Devlin leases his mineral rights to finance his dream of farming. He doesn’t count on the truck traffic and nonstop noise or the disruption of his family’s life.

We Could Be Beautiful: A Novel by Swan Huntley – a glittering, seductive, utterly surprising story of love, money, greed, and family.

Trail of Echoes Rachel Howzell Hall – Detective Lou Norton investigates crimes against exceptional African American girls who belong to the same school district.

The Sport of Kings, by C E Morgan – Hellsmouth, an indomitable Thoroughbred with the blood of Triple Crown winners in her veins, runs for the glory of the Forge family, one of Kentucky s oldest and most powerful dynasties. spiraling tale of wealth and poverty, racism and rage, “The Sport of Kings” is an unflinching portrait of lives cast in shadow by the enduring legacy of slavery.

Ladivine, by Marie N Diaye, translated by Jordan Stump – A trio of women create, discover, and keep disappearing on each other in this melancholy modern fable.

Imagine Me Gone, by Adam Haslett – This touching chronicle of love and pain traces half a century in a family of five from the parents’ engagement in 1963 through a father’s and son’s psychological torments and a final crisis.

Sweet Lamb of Heaven, by Lydia Millet – Blending domestic thriller and psychological horror, this compelling page-turner follows a mother fleeing her estranged husband.

The Adventurist, by J Bradford – A brilliant, introspective, socially awkward software engineer navigates corporate and personal challenges. The writing is just about perfect: incisive, eloquent, philosophical, and witty by turns, a top-notch talent.

Caroline Poppendeck, Librarian
Steele Memorial Library

Check Out Our Book Bundle Podcast! April 1, 2016

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With all the books we have in the Adult Fiction stacks, how do you find one that you will like?

We have all faced this dilemma, and sometimes we’re stumped! What to read next?

CCLD has come to the rescue!! (Ta daaa!!!) We now have a podcast to combat this dilemma! What is a podcast, you ask?

The Merriam Webster Tenth International Collegiate Dictionary defines “podcast” as: a program made available in digital format for automatic download over the Internet. (thanks, Wikipedia!)

For us, podcast means: check the front page on our website (http://ccld.lib.ny.us/), scan the links on the right side of the page, and look for the word “podcast”. Click to go directly to the site, and start listening at your convenience!

In about 20 minutes you will have the title and author of about a dozen books well–reviewed from either Amazon, Goodreads, or from myself, covering any and all genres, all strong contenders worthy of your reading time. That saves YOU a lot of fishing time (looking for the next interesting read). Checking reviews is done for you, and you can be sure the choices are going to be enjoyable.

I will give you a heads’ up on issues in the storyline and other points noted in the reviews, but will never give the story away. All books will be chosen from our shelves. I won’t be filling the podcast time with popular authors, because I know you are looking for something that may not have had the publicity of the bestsellers.

So click, listen, and decide which read is for you. All titles will be repeated at the end of the show for your convenience.

You’re welcome!

Caroline Poppendeck, Librarian
Steele Memorial Library

What is New Adult Fiction? March 9, 2016

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It seems like we are bombarded with more labels just when the world seems to be shedding old, worn ones. Labels are meant to be useful tools, and despite our preference to rid ourselves of them, they do serve a purpose.

For example: New Adult fiction is geared for readers 18 to about 25, sometimes as old as 30, who have outgrown Young Adult fiction, which is based on high school aged protagonists.

The description as per EBSCO’s NoveList is rather long, so I have included the site address for more information, a partial description is as follows; *”This fledgling category is a result of the perceived dearth of novels featuring characters in a post-adolescent but not quite adult phase of life, as well as the growing trend of young adult “crossovers,” or YA novels that also appeal to an adult audience. These novels aim to bring the emotionally-intense story lines and fast-paced plotting of young adult fiction to stories that focus on a new range of experiences in life beyond the teenage years.”

Some of the New Adult fiction we have here at the library:

iamradarI Am Radar, by Reif Larsen

Twisted Innocence, by Terrie Blackstock

Falling for Autumn, by Heather Topham Wood

Casebook, by Mona Simpson

The Child’s Child, by Barbara Vine

The Irresistible Henry House, by Lisa Grunwald

Indignation, by Philip Roth


Caroline Poppendeck, Librarian
Steele Memorial Library

Best Kids Books of 2015 December 16, 2015

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Season’s Readings! Here are some of the best kids books of 2015:

Picture Books:

beekle.jpgThe Day the Crayons Came Home by Drew Dewalt

Waiting by Kevin Henkes

Winnie: The True Story of the Bear who Inspired Winnie-the-Pooh by Sally Walker

The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend by Dan Santat (Caldecott Award Winner)

I will Take a Nap! By Mo Willems

The Princess and the Pony by Kate Beaton

Sidewalk Flowers by JonArno Lawson

I Wish You More by Amy Krouse Rosenthal

A Great Big Cuddle: Poems for the Very Young by Michael Rosen

Lenny & Lucy by Philip Stead

Chapter Books:

crossover.jpgThe Sword of Summer by Rick Riordan

George by Alex Gino

The Thing about Jellyfish by Ali Benjamin

The War that Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

The Marvels by Brian Selznick

Echo by Pam Munoz Ryan

Lockwood and Company by Jonathan Stroud

Circus Mirandas by Cassie Beasley

The Nest by Kenneth Oppel

The Crossover by Kwame Alexander (Newbury Award Winner)

The Best Reads for 2015 – Adult Fiction December 8, 2015

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There have been lots of choices this year for intriguing reading; from the predominant authors to independent releases, there is no end of new stories to enjoy.

fatesandfuriesThe best of the year (all are in no particular order):

Lauren Groff – Fates and Furies

Paula Hawkins – The Girl on the Train

Susan Barker – The Incarnations

Kathleen Alcott – Infinite Home

Hanya Yanagihara – A Little Life

M.O. Walsh – My Sunshine Away

Ludmila Ulitskaya – The Big Green Tent

The best from the popular authors:

Harlan Coben – The Stranger

Jonathan Franzen – Purity

Sue Grafton – X

David Mitchell – Slade House

Toni Morrison – God Help the Child

Louise Penny – The Nature of the Beast

Salman Rushdie – Two Years Eight Months Twenty-Eight Nights

The best from debut authors:

Katherine Heiny – Single, Carefree, Mellow

James E. McTeer II – Minnow

Bill Clegg – Did You Ever Have a Family

Angela Flournoy – The Turner House

New non-fiction books to look for! July 7, 2015

Posted by CCLD in New Non-Fiction, Recommendations, Steele.
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headstrongHeadstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science -And the World by Rachel Swaby. This book brings to life the inspiring biographies of 52 female visionaries in science, technology, engineering and math.

When Parents Part: How Mothers and Fathers Can Help Their Children Deal with Separation and Divorce by Penelope Leach. Library Journal Starred Review, this book is a well-researched and comprehensive guide for parents to help guide their children through separation and divorce, staying focused on putting the child’s needs first.

10% Human: How Your Body’s Microbes Hold the Key to Health and Happiness by Allana Collen. This book delves into the importance of microbes in the human system to the health and well-being of our bodies.

The Real- Life MBA: Your No-BS Guide to Winning the Game, Building a Team, and Growing Your Career by Jack and Suzy Welch. The authors tackle the real problems of business today with practical advice and strategies for leading and managing others, and developing your career.

Stop by to browse new non-fiction at Steele April 24, 2015

Posted by CCLD in New Non-Fiction, Recommendations, Steele.
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sparepartsNew non-fiction books are always fun to browse, and this month is no exception.

Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik Larson is an incredibly detailed narrative of a well known event of World War I, the German attack on and the sinking of the Lusitania.

100 Years of Brodies With Hal Roach: the Jaunty Journeys of a Hollywood Motion Picture and Television Pioneer by Craig Calman is a book featuring the illustrious film career of the legendary film producer Hal Roach, famous for Laurel and Hardy , Our Gang Comedies, Topper, Of Mice and Men, and television series such as My Little Margie and the Gale Storm Show: Oh Susanna!.

Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad by Eric Foner brings to life the story of the Underground Railroad .

The Handy Investing Answer Book by Paul A. Tucci is a question and answer guide to investing. This book explains the differences in various investment instruments, clarifies concepts and definitions, and introduces investment strategies.

Spare Parts: Four Undocumented Teenagers, One Ugly Robot, and the Battle for the American Dream by Joshua Davis is a story about four Mexican American students who come together and build a robot out of scavenged parts, and win the “Marine Advanced Technology Education Robotics Competition at the University of California, Santa Barbara (2004). But the story also involves tails of immigration laws and the triumphs and tribulations for these four boys before and after the competition.

It is not just about New Year’s resolutions March 9, 2015

Posted by CCLD in New Non-Fiction, Recommendations, Steele.
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2020It is not just about New Year’s resolutions, the focus for Americans today seems to be about Healthy Lifestyles. There is information on healthy eating, special diets, healthy aging, and lifestyle changes in general. This trend of course is a tremendous boon for publishers, and there is definitely something for everyone. Below please find some of our New Non-fiction books to pique your interest.

20/20 Diet: Turn Your Weight Loss Vision Into Reality by Phil McGraw. This book explains seven reasons why dieters hit dieting roadblocks . The book also educates the reader in why they should eat the “right” foods to fuel their body properly. There is a diet or food plan included that can be continued for the rest of one’s life.

The Gluten-Free Revolution: Absolutely Everything You Need to Know About Losing the Wheat, Reclaiming Your Health, and Living Happily Ever After by Jax Peters Lowell. This book is packed with the newest information and resources on living without gluten. It guides readers through the basics of reading labels, preparing foods at home, and dining out.

The Rockstar Remedy: A Rock & Roll Doctor’s Prescription for Living a Long, Healthy Life by Dr. Gabrielle Francis. In this book, Dr. Gabrielle Francis, a holistic practitioner to the music industry’s elite, shares her inner secrets on keeping these performers at the top of their game, in spite of the fact they also party like rock stars.

Vitamania: Our Obsessive Quest for Nutritional Perfection by Catherine Price. An entertaining and enlightening investigation into the unregulated world of nutritional supplements. The author leans toward getting one’s nutrition from real food.

Connie Ogilvie, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

Self-improvement in 2015 February 23, 2015

Posted by CCLD in New Non-Fiction, Recommendations, Steele.
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Anxiety BustersWhenever a New Year approaches we all tend to look towards declaring resolutions, making changes in our lives, and embarking on new paths. Even though 2015 has already rolled in, I see the Winter Blues as a perfect motivation for seeking these new paths to self-improvement.
On that note there are several New non-fiction books that I would like to share with you.

“10 Best Anxiety Busters: Simple Strategies to Take Control of Your Worry,” by Wehrenberg, Margaret. In ten simple techniques this guide describes effective remedies for worry and anxiety.

“The 20/20 Diet: Turn Your Weight Loss Vision Into Reality,” by McGraw, Phil. Dr. Phil discusses the reasons diets fail and identifies 20 key foods that will help you get beyond the failures and help you lose weight.

“Clear the Clutter, Find Happiness: One-Minute Tips For De-Cluttering and Refreshing Your Home and Your Life,” by Smallin, Donna. This book presents a manageable and simple approach to organizing and de-cluttering your home.

Connie Ogilvie, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

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