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Something For Everyone August 6, 2014

Posted by CCLD in Recommendations.
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acquittalNon-Fiction books cover many topics and I find it hard to choose just one area to write about.

With back to school on the horizon….two parenting titles “Redefining Girly: How Parents Can Fight the Stereotyping and Sexualizing of Girlhood, from Birth to Tween” by Melissa Atkins Wardy, has eye opening advice on raising a balanced, self confident girl.

“8 Keys to End Bullying : Strategies for Parents & Schools” by Signe Whitson, provides an excellent set of tools for parents and teachers in dealing with bullies.

For sheer entertainment and items of interest…“Not to be Missed: Fifty-Four Favorites From a Lifetime of Film” by Kenneth Turan, enthusiastic reviews of the author’s favorite movies through the decades.

“Good Talk Dad: The Birds and the Bees..and Other conversations We Forgot to Have”, by Bill Geist and Willie Geist, a humorous book about the shared journey of this father-son relationship.

“Acquittal: An Insider Reveals the Stories and Strategies Behind Today’s Most Infamous Verdicts” by Richard Gabriel, discusses the intricate workings of the justice system, while highlighting some very famous trials and their verdicts.

Connie Ogilvie, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

THE GOOD LORD BIRD by James McBride July 25, 2014

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The Good Lord BirdWith his novel The Good Lord Bird James McBride can stand shoulder to shoulder with the likes of Mark Twain and John Steinbeck. The book is thought provoking, passionate and beautifully written. It is also a great read of the kind that will have you glued to the page and regret leaving McBride’s world when it winds to its end. You come away wishing that McBride had gifted us with, at least, two or three hundred more pages.

The Good Lord Bird takes place in the “Bloody Kansas” of the 1850s where the question of its being a free or slave state was being argued with swords and blood. It is the picaresque story of Henry, a young slave who is – more or less – forced into freedom. To keep his rocky freedom, life and – truth be told – have an easier time of it, he dons a dress and becomes the comely “Onion”. The moniker is bestowed by no less a personage than John Brown. “Onion” finds “herself” pulled into Brown’s orbit and witnessing the God obsessed madman’s career from the Scourge of Kansas to his martyrdom at Harper’s Ferry. Along the way Onion meets the likes of Frederic Douglass and Harriet Tubman as well as having his disguise threatened by young love and lust.

McBride surveys the institution of slavery with a cold, clear eye. One sees the horrors, degradation and twisted values that slavery inculcated. At the same time there are surprising depths of compassion for the slave, the slave owner and those around who find themselves caught up in the historical tide. Violence flares up at the drop of an insult or a madman’s whim. Historical personages we now regard as secular saints are seen to have flaws aplenty that – strangely – add to their stature rather than diminish. The only character to retain her mythic proportions is Harriet Tubman, who comes across as fierce and canny a revolutionary as any born in the 20th century. All of this is brought to us in a rollicking, very funny and truly affecting tall tale. I cannot recommend The Good Lord Bird high enough.

Jack Olcott, Page
Horseheads Branch CCLD

There’s a book for that! July 7, 2014

Posted by roganp in Central (Steele), District News, Recommendations.
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PhyllisBy the time you read this, I will be retired. Connie Ogilvie has taken over the writing of this column but I asked her if I could use it to say goodbye. I have loved working in a public library, meeting our patrons and volunteers and talking books with them. Another great benefit of working in a public library is working with other reference librarians who keep up with the latest technology and are so happy to keep other staff and patrons updated too. Please look for the list of technology classes on our calendar of events.

We started Librarian’s Picks on our website twenty years ago, to try and let people know about all the treasures and information in the nonfiction section of the library. Although I always considered myself a reader and a public library user, I never realized how much easier my life would have been if I knew what was available in the library, before I became a librarian. For example:  shortly after I got the job, my son who had just graduated from college and had moved to California called me on Thanksgiving Day to say he was in a hospital in Los Angeles because he had been in an accident, breaking several bones in his face; the surgeon who would be operating in the morning didn’t speak much English but did tell him that he might lose his eye or hearing and have scars. I told him to not sign anything until I called him back, knowing that we had a book in the reference department titled Best Doctors and other books listing medical specialties and the people accredited in them. I raced to the library and found he didn’t need a plastic surgeon but a cranial facial surgeon; the best one, the one who other doctors would take their family to, was in Santa Monica so I got his phone number and called my son back and had him call the doctor. He answered his phone and told Dan that he would gather his team and operate the next day, which he did. Dan had no hearing loss, no eyesight lost, no scars. The doctor’s staff asked how Dan knew to come to this surgeon and he answered: “My Mom is a librarian”. Later I came across books that I would have loved to know existed when I was a homemaker, such as What to expect the first year by Heidi Murkoff, and wanted other people to know they existed, but never found the perfect way. When we were young, my husband and I bought a very old house and remodeled it ourselves, learning as we went with all the mishaps and mistakes. I later discovered that the library had books that told you exactly how to do each of the things we struggled with.

My mantra as a librarian is “From birth to death, no matter what you do, there is a book or video to help you do it easier or better at the library. ” So the next time you have a question or are struggling with a problem , consider coming to the library for a book, a video, a class or a chat with a reference librarian.

Phyllis Rogan, Librarian

Fascinating Biographies & Personal Narratives June 2, 2014

Posted by roganp in Recommendations.
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Glitter and GlueEven though I no longer choose nonfiction books for the library, I love to browse the New Nonfiction on the first floor of the Central Library of CCLD. There are so many good books on so many subjects, but I still tend to grab biographies or personal narratives; I grabbed three fascinating ones last month.

The first one was Glitter and Glue by Kelly Corrigan, which on the surface is about a woman who graduates from college and wants life to be an adventure; after she works for a year to save money, she and a friend take off for New Zealand , Thailand, and Australia, where she runs out of money and takes a job as a nanny. She writes really well and this appears to be a light, quick, fun read, but when you get to the end, you realize it is really about relationships, specifically between mothers and daughters and how it changes over time and experience. I so wanted to talk about the ideas in this book; I wished I belonged to a book club so I would be able to talk about it with others who had also read it.

The next one I read was One Doctor: close calls, cold cases and the mysteries of medicine by Brendan Reilly. It always amazes me how well some doctors write! I read anything by doctors Jerome Groopman or Atul Gawande and now I have a third doctor who illuminates life choices we all make. Drawing us in like the best medical shows on TV by describing his patients, he shows us how doctors make life and death decisions every day.

The third one I read was This is the Story of a Happy Marriage by Ann Patchett. The well-known writer of fiction writes not a straight biography but each chapter is an essay formerly written for a magazine or newspaper about some aspect of her life; she writes about her devotion to writing and gives advice to wanna-be-writers, she writes about caring for her dog, her grandmother and a nun who was her teacher in grade school. Her honesty and nuanced essays will make you consider what she says long after you have finished the book.

Although all of these books were about someone’s experiences, only one was in the biographies. Glitter can be found under call #910.4 COR and One Doctor can be found in #610. 69 REI.  Enjoy!

Phyllis Rogan, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

Books to Movies for Teens @ your CCLD Library! May 19, 2014

Posted by metzgerd in Recommendations, Teen.
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Have your teens seen the Hunger Games and Divergent movies, read the books, and are clamoring for more? (Are YOU?) Good news! More movies based on great teen books are due out this summer!  Check out the books from our Central library, any CCLD branch library, or download the library’s ebooks from STARCat to read the books before the movies come out!

Upcoming books to movies this SUMMER:

Fault in our Stars (by John Green) Movie release: June 6, 2014

DJM, teen librarian, says: “I read this in one day, cried buckets, and could not shake off the book for several days. Worth every tear!”

STARCat summary: “Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten.”

STARCat link for the book: http://starcat.stls.org/client/en_US/default/search/results/?ln=en_US&q=fault+in+our+stars&rw=0

Movie Trailer Link:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ItBvH5J6ss

Other cool books by John Green: http://starcat.stls.org/client/en_US/default/search/results?qu=green%2C+john&te=&lm=YA


Loved Fault in our Stars? Want more about teens facing life, death, loss and love? Try:

If I Stay by Gayle Forman (Movie release: August 22, 2014)

STARCat summary:

“While in a coma following an automobile accident that killed her parents and younger brother, seventeen-year-old Mia, a gifted cellist, weighs whether to live with her grief or join her family in death. Little by little she struggles to put together the pieces- to figure out what she has lost, what she has left, and the very difficult choice she must make. Heartwrenchingly beautiful, this will change the way you look at life, love, and family.”

STARCat Link for the book: http://starcat.stls.org/client/en_US/default/search/results?qu=if+i+stay&te=&lm=YA&rt=false|||TITLE|||Title

Movie Trailer:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMp896hfp74

Don’t miss other excellent books on these poignant issues:

Thirteen R3asons Why (Jay Asher)

STARCat Link for the book:  http://starcat.stls.org/client/en_US/default/search/results?qu=Thirteen+reasons+why&te=&lm=YA&rt=false|||TITLE|||Title

Before I die (Jenny Downham)

A terminally ill teenage girl makes and carries out a list of things to do before she dies

STARCat Link for the book:  http://starcat.stls.org/client/en_US/default/search/results?qu=Before+I+die&te=&lm=YA&rt=false|||TITLE|||Title

(fan made) BOOK trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EUhWH67YZtQ


For Award winning, classic, dystopian fiction:

The Giver by Lois Lowry (movie release: August 15, 2014)

DJM, teen librarian: “..another book I could not put down and thus read in one day. Harrowing, and thought provoking. Would YOU choose to remember sorrow and pain? Life is easier without choice or decisions, but is that really living?”

STARCat summary: “Jonas’s world is perfect. Everything is under control. There is no war or fear of pain. There are no choices. Every person is assigned a role in the community. When Jonas turns 12 he is singled out to receive special training from The Giver. The Giver alone holds the memories of the true pain and pleasure of life. Now, it is time for Jonas to receive the truth. There is no turning back.”

STARCat Link for the book:

http://starcat.stls.org/client/en_US/default/search/results?qu=the+Giver&te=&lm=YA&rt=false|||TITLE|||Title

Don’t miss the rest of Lois Lowry’s GIVER books: “Gathering Blue”; “Messenger”; and “Son.”

STARCat Link for the rest of the GIVER (“Quartet”) books: http://starcat.stls.org/client/en_US/default/search/results?qu=lowry%2C+lois&te=&lm=YA&rt=false|||AUTHOR|||Author

Movie Trailer for The Giver:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oYZxZups06w

Meryl Streep, Jeff Bridges, star in this award winning, classic, dystopian fiction.


Never a Dull Moment for Teens @ Central Library!

Stay tuned to our Calendar of Events for teen events such as Teen Night, Manga Club, and “Spark a Reaction” Teen Summer Reading fun in July & August.

Teens & Parents: Want reminders for TEEN-only Central (Steele) Library events in your email or your cell phone? Teen Librarian Doris Jean uses “Remind 101″; Your cell phone number will remain private. You will receive reminder messages about teen library events from librarian Doris Jean. You can choose to unsubscribe at any time. Here’s how to sign up for text OR email reminders: For TEXT reminders: text the message @teenevent to the number (607)281-6812; for EMAIL reminders: send a blank email to “teenevent@mail.remind101.com”.

Doris Jean Metzger, MLIS
Teen Services, Central Library, CCLD

 

Resources for Parents – New Non-fiction at the Central Library April 30, 2014

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Jo Frost's Toddler RulesParenting a child is incredibly rewarding, yet can also be frustrating at times. Children have physical and emotional needs and a parent is on 24/7. Children need nourishment, love, understanding, structure, discipline, and the list goes on. We open our hearts to our children and we try to do what we think is best for them. Ultimately, when it comes to parenting, I think following your instincts and your knowledge of your child is what has worked for me. But along the way we all seek books and magazine articles for advice, knowledge, inspiration, and encouragement.

Chemung County Library District has parenting books on many topics including raising your children, behavioral issues, children with special needs, bullying, or even estrangement from an older child. The library can provide information on so many parenting issues.

These are some of the new non-fiction books at the Central Library on parenting where you can find information on your child from birth through the teen years.

Bumpology the Myth-Busting Pregnancy Book for Curious Parents-To-Be by Linda Geddes. This book discusses the latest research on various topics of concern from pregnancy through the baby’s first year.

Calm Mama Happy Baby the Simple Intuitive way to Tame Tears Improve Sleep and help Your Family Thrive by Derek O’Neil, CHP & Jennifer Waldburger, MSW. This book gives Moms practical tools for choosing calm over stress no matter what is happening that day.

Mindful Parenting: Simple and Powerful Solutions for Raising Creative Engaged Happy Kids in Today’s Hectic World by Kristen Race. A thoughtful science-based plan that helps parents and kids use simple techniques to deal with the stresses of our modern day lives.

Jo Frost’s Toddler Rules Your 5-Step Guide to Shaping Proper Behavior by Jo Frost. Jo Frost, the supernanny, presents a simple but effective 5-step program that guides parents to tame tantrums, prevent bad behavior and create stability in the home environment.

Got Teens? The Doctor Mom’s guide to Sexuality, Social Media and Other Adolescent Realities by Logan Levkoff, PhD & Jennifer Wider, MD. This book gives parents the confidence to answer their children’s tough questions that come up in today’s world and decode what their children really want to know.

Connie Ogilvie, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

Did you know that your public library is a vacation planner’s paradise? April 14, 2014

Posted by cclddirector in Community, Director's Comments, District News, Recommendations, Reference, Technology.
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About a year ago my daughters and I were in the process of planning for their first trip to Europe. Seeing that all three of us were recent college graduates we balked at the thought of signing up for a group tour package. Deciding to set our own itinerary meant we would have a whole lot of work ahead of us.

Fortunately my daughters figured that since dad was paying for the trip they wouldn’t complain at where he wanted to go (amazing how that works out). We decided to use library materials as our “travel agent” to give us tips on where to go and what to see. So for a few months prior to our departure I checked out travel guides, books and DVDs to learn more about Europe. And borrowing from the library helped us save money. After all who can’t use extra cash when they are going on vacation?

In addition, the suggested itineraries helped us focus our sightseeing on the places we really wanted to visit while making sure we didn’t overextend ourselves. We also had copies of important phrases from different guide books so we could at least say “please” and “thank you” in the language of where we were (a hint- the good guide books will have an index of common foreign language phrases).  I had also checked out a French CD to brush up on my skills as well as used our Mango Languages program to make sure the phrases we were trying to use sounded reasonably close. If you are not familiar with Mango Languages, it is an online language-learning system, teaching conversation skills for over 30 languages including English. Mango uses real-life situations and actual conversations to more effectively teach a new language. Once again, this is a free database available at CCLD.  All you need is your library card and PIN to access Mango Languages.

We used the library computers to research the State Department website to make sure where we were going was safe, checked on flights and trains, and researched tricks to help save money on airfare and hotels. Fortunately, we had also downloaded a few library eBooks prior to departure which gave us something to read during the long flights and delays we encountered.

So the next time you are going on vacation come on in and give us a try. You will find a variety of resources to help make your trip more enjoyable.  Also, make sure to sign up for our vacation planning class next month at the Central Library:  Roadtripping – May 21 at 6pm.  Learn to plan, organize, and discover great places to visit this summer using roadtrippers.com and more. The Tech Lab Class is limited to 12 participants. Call today to register 733-9175.

Ronald W. Shaw
Director, CCLD

New cookbooks at the Central Library April 1, 2014

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stuffedThere is definitely a science to cooking, measuring ingredients, heating at the perfect temperature, blending ingredients to make sauces, and the timing involved in preparing a recipe. But cooking is a lot more than just a science. Cooking is an art form! The fact is, cooking impacts all of our senses. The aromas of the carefully chosen seasonings, the sounds of chopping as we prepare ingredients or that hot sizzling in a pan, and there is the visual presentation of complimentary colors and textures. Then of course is the finale, the wonderful tastes and textures of your creation!

Our library has so many wonderful cookbooks that can take you around the world on any given night or perhaps for a special occasion. There is Italian, Mexican, or Thai cooking; or you can find books on dietary styles such as vegetarian, low-fat, or gluten free. Whatever cuisine you fancy, I’m sure you will find it in our library’s cookbook collection. Even if you’re not a cook, you have to appreciate CCLD Central Library’s beautiful collection of cookbooks! Here are some of our newest titles…..

Cooking for two : more than 130 delicious recipes to enjoy together Edited by Jeff Nowak Healthy – sensible small batch cooking with the nutritional information provided.

Grain Power By Patricia Green and Carolyn Hemming – over 100 easy to make recipes featuring gluten-free ancient grains.

Lidia’s commonsense Italian cooking : 150 delicious and simple recipes everyone can master By Lidia Mattichio Bastianich and Tanya Bastianich Manuali – easy steps to wonderful recipes, plus tips for choosing and preparing ingredients.

New Middle Eastern street food : snacks, comfort food, and mezze from Snackistan By Sally Butcher – a variety of Middle Eastern snack recipes for those who love this exotic cuisine.

Stuffed : the ultimate comfort food cookbook : taking your favorite foods and stuffing them to make new, different and delicious meals By Dan Whalen – some fun and different recipes, taken to the Extreme!

Connie Ogilvie, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

Mrow! New non-fiction books about cats… March 4, 2014

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Guys Can Be Cat Ladies TooIf you Google “cats” you can find the definition of cats, advice on health care for cats, cat quotes, cat blogs, and of course cats on YouTube. I noted “Adopt a Cat Month”, which is June, “National Cat Day”, October 29th, and don’t forget “National Hug Your Cat Day” which is celebrated on June 4th. I understand cats make wonderful pets and I know there are many cat lovers out there. This entry is for those who are already cat lovers, as well as those who are intrigued by our furry feline friends.

Our non-fiction collection boasts a treasure trove of books about cats, including raising a cat, cat first aid, and training your cat. There are also a number of books that contain anecdotal or humorous stories about cats. The Dewey decimal number to look for is 636.8, our selection is abundant, and you won’t be disappointed!

This month as I perused the New Book non-fiction section at the Central Library for inspiration to write about, I came across four interesting and different books about cats that caught my attention.

The Complete Cat Breed Book Edited by Dorling Kindersley, a beautifully illustrated book describing
100 cat breeds and information on caring for your cat.

The Cat Whisperer by Mieshelle Nagelschneider, practical and effective strategies for solving a wide range of feline behavior problems.

The Big New Yorker Book of Cats Foreword by Anthony Lane, a stellar collection of writers contributing stories about our feline companions from the archives of the New Yorker.

Guys Can Be Cat Ladies Too: A Guidebook for Men and Their Cats by Michael Showalter, a one of a kind guide to help a guy understand and ultimately bond with the felines in his life. Educational, and definitely humorous!

Connie Ogilvie, Reference Librarian
Chemung County Library District

The Creepy and the Ghoulish February 24, 2014

Posted by poppendeckc in Horseheads, Recommendations.
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Ghost HuntersWe at Horseheads Library recently added some ghost hunting series DVDs to our collection. For those of us who enjoy a spooky, spine-tingling adventure, we now have Ghost Hunters, with Jason Hawes and Grant Wilson. This show currently has the most episodes for borrowing, so you can really immerse yourself in the chain-rattling thrills. We also have the spinoff show, Ghost Hunters International. Visit ruined castles and experience hauntings from around the world!

The Cream of the Creepy Award has to go to Syfy Channel’s Paranormal State, with Ryan Buell, an amazing cast of paranormal researchers, and great psychics, including the astounding Chip Coffey, who is right from Elmira, NY! I personally hang on every word and every gesture from Chip. His input in any case is fascinating.

Also featured here at Horseheads Library is The Discovery Channel’s A Haunting. This series has fewer episodes, but are worthy of your time. They are re-enactments of eyewitness accounts of the paranormal. These have the entertainment quality of a good ghost story. You can watch the haunting as it unfolds by actors, with interviews from the eyewitnesses.

It doesn’t have to be Halloween to have a scare-a-thon. Try one this weekend!

Caroline Poppendeck, Librarian
CCLD, Horseheads

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